The People

The Historic Portland Public Market Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization under which the James Beard Public Market will operate. It grew out of a task force that started meeting in 2000, made up of a diverse group of Oregonians committed to creating a public market to showcase the state’s bounty and honor Oregon native James Beard. The foundation has worked tirelessly for more than a decade to bring its vision to life.

Board of Trustees

Richard Harris, President

Wendy Lane Stevens, Vice President

Janie Hibler, Secretary

Andrew Franklin, Treasurer

Pippa Arend

Kanth Gopalpur

Amelia Hard

Paula Hayes

Greg Higgins

John Hull

Heather Killough

Martin McClanan

Gary Roth

Nancy Ponzi

Team

Fred joined James Beard Public Market in September 2015 with a proven track record of successfully leading businesses, nonprofits and task forces across both public and private sectors. Fred is the former President & CEO of the Portland State University Foundation, former Special Counsel for Business to the Oregon Attorney General, and Co-Founder and Chair of Co-Operations, Inc. As an attorney for over two decades, his practice focused on corporate transactions, finance and reorganizations.

A graduate from the University of Virginia with a B.A. with honors in Economics, Fred was awarded his J.D. by the Wake Forest University School of Law. Fred served as a Field Artillery Officer for the U.S. Army from 1974 – 1978. Granum is also an experienced civic and nonprofit leader, who has provided his expertise and support for more than eight Oregon-based community organizations, including the Cascade Pacific Council, B.S.A; Oregon Ballet Theatre; Youth Villages Oregon and its predecessor, ChristieCare.

Lori Warner-McGee, Development DirectorLori has been organizing support to make the James Beard Public Market a reality since 2012. She brings people and organizations together with the shared conviction that a year-round public market will be transformative for Portland and Oregon. Lori’s introduction to the world of fresh, local, organic, seasonal foods started with her first job as a business manager/trainer from 1995-1997 at Elephant’s Delicatessen, a company committed to making food from scratch that was a pioneer of the “open kitchen” concept. Her business degree from Ball State University in Indiana and paralegal certification then took her to various management positions at Dex Media from 1997-2005.

Lori’s non-profit development career includes Adopt-A-Minefield, a United Nations program to clear landmines, assist survivors, and educate impacted communities. She led the development team at DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital from 2006-2011. Lori also worked as development director for Friends of Zenger Farm in 2011 and 2012, helping that organization launch a successful $2.1 million capital campaign to build a commercial kitchen microenterprise development center. Lori currently services as vice president/president-elect of the board of Northwest Planned Giving Roundtable, an association of ~200 development professionals.

Carter_Suzi_headshot_2015“What we need is here.” –Wendell Berry

Suzi Carter is a multi-passionate community builder for progressive change projects. Joining the James Beard Public Market team in August 2016, she brings community organizing, strategic communications, startup fundraising and capital campaign experience with a focus on local food systems, placemaking and social justice.

Before the public market, Suzi was the Director of Programs and Partnerships for Food Co-op Initiative, a national nonprofit that supports the development, success and sustainability of new food cooperatives delivering access to healthy, local food in diverse communities across the country. In this role, she provided technical assistance and training to community leaders, and developed program and financial partnerships in the public and private sectors.

Between 2007 and 2013, Suzi was critical to the launch of three community development projects in Harrisonburg, VA: (1) As Program Director of the Northend Greenway for New Community Project, she built public will to raise over $2m and developed a private-public partnership to fund the city’s first greenway through historically neglected neighborhoods of the city. (2) As Outreach Coordinator for Friendly City Food Co-op, Suzi directed the successful completion of a $1.3m capital campaign and 4,000-member drive to open this full-service food co-op in 2011. She went on to become the Marketing and Membership Manager, where she helped to open and operate the $3.5m grocery store, providing over 60 local farmers and producers a new, reliable distribution channel to sell their fresh foods and value-added products, and food education and outreach programs to learn with thousands of children and adults. After spending her college years bartending at the only microbrewery in town, (3) she and a friend teamed up with a local restauranteur in 2007 to open Clementine, a restaurant, music and community events venue, where she served as the Front of House and Events Manager.

Suzi has also consulted with CDS Consulting Co-op and National Cooperative Business Association CLUSA International, a trade organization that works in over 100 countries to provide cross-sector education, technical assistance and advocacy for food security and community based health. Throughout her career she has served as a board member, pro bono consultant and/or event organizer for various nonprofits, including the Shenandoah Valley Food and Farm Working Group, Local Food and Farm Summit, Harrisonburg-Rockingham Green Network, Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition, United Way of Harrisonburg-Rockingham County, Portland Playhouse, and Wayside Center for Popular Education, a movement resources space for emerging leaders working at the forefront of equity and justice issues across the rural South.

A graduate of James Madison University, Suzi was named Top 10 Under 40 by Shenandoah Valley Business Journal in 2012. As a regular conference presenter she’s given over 75 talks, workshops and trainings on community engagement, food co-op development, food systems, and communications.

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